_________

MEMBERSHIPS
ARE DUE!

YOU GET TO BE A TRAA MEMBER FOR A WHOLE YEAR FOR ONLY $25.00DuesYour membership also adds another voice to our efforts in protecting and enhancing aquatic habitats in the London & area community.
YOU'VE TAKEN A LOT OF ENJOYMENT FROM THIS UNIQUE FISHERY. IT'S TIME TO GIVE BACK BY BEING PART OF THE SOLUTION.

____________

 

! FUNDRAISING!
Efforts are underway
to get the $$$
we need to continue many of the TRAA's most vital projects:

$$
Improvements to the
Trout Fry
TRAA Trout Hatchery

$$
Continuation of the

Salmonid Monitoring Program

$$
Komoka Creek
Hydrological Study

Please email us if
you'd like to take
an active role in
raising the funds
needed for these
and other important TRAA activities.


_________

 

TRAA Membership
Only $25!!!!Membership

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRAA Salmonid Monitoring
Spring 2011

TRAA members and personnel from the Upper Thames
River Conservation Authority (UTRCA) are conducting a
5-year Salmonid Tagging and Monitoring Program.

Click Here for pictures and descriptions from Year 2 (2012).

Here's an overview of what happened in 2011.

E-shocking Pretty Stream

John Schwindt from the Upper Thames River Conservation
Authority probes the depths of Komoka Creek looking
for returning steelhead (lake-run rainbow trout).

 

E-shock Close-up

While John continues checking out likely looking spots,
Bryon Mott apparently seems exited about something
everyone else seems to have missed!

 

Large Male Bow

A heavy male rainbow trout captured for his vital
statistics: length, girth, check for fin clips and a scale
sample for DNA. This work is done quickly to ensure a
minimum of stress to the fish prior to release.

 

Measuring Girth

This male rainbow trout was measured, tagged,
sampled for DNA testing and released back into
the stream. The impact on the fish was minimal.

 

Tye Supervises

Tye is the landowner's dog. We spent a great deal
of time making sure Tye was not in the water while
we were electro-shocking. He was very interested
in the tagging technique displayed by Paul Noble
and Lawson Jones.

 

Tagging Technique

The tagging actually consists of "sewing" a small,
plastic tag to the dorsal fin of the rainbow trout.
The tag has a number sequence that will help the
OMNR and the TRAA to understand the fish's activities.
This is why it's so important for you to report a
tagged fish as soon as possible.

 

Scale Sampling

Scale samples are taken from every tagged fish for DNA
analysis to determine age and genetic classification.

 

Recaptured Rainbow

This rainbow trout is a "repeat customer". She was
tagged during one of our 2010 outings. How cool is that!

 

Ooops Got Away

Every now and then a trout eludes the gauntlet of nets.
As you can tell by their faces, it's usually a big one.

 

Resident Trout

One of the really awesome aspects of capturing
the returning rainbow trout is you don't always get what
you expect. Brian Mott displays one of the many resident
brown trout that we encountered as Krystal Jones looks on.

 

Nice Release

After all the scientific measurement crap that the trout
goes through, it needs to be carefully released.

 

Another Release

Stephen Jones safely releases another tagged and
documented rainbow trout.

 

Click Here for pictures and descriptions from Year 3 (2012).